Classics and Ancient History

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Public vs Private: Revisiting Sappho’s world

By Oliver Maynard

Edited by Sienna Melki

Abstract

The ancient Greek lyric poet Sappho offers one of few extant pieces of female authorship, and yet, still, she has been heralded as ‘the tenth Muse’. Much of her work describes female homosexuality; but, despite the seemingly personal nature of the work, the possibility remains that Sappho can in fact be classed as a ‘public’ poet. Saphho’s world is a complex one, but this essay paints a picture of her as a credit to women everywhere and demonstrates how Classics can be used to uncover marginalised voices which can be seen to reflect our own times.

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Classics and Ancient History

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In what respects could Roman Italy be described as a ‘slave society’?

By Louisa Pannifer

Edited by Nia Morris

Abstract

In the ancient, Rome emerged as the superpower of western civilisation continually conquering surrounding lands and expanding their own territories. Whilst the military and politics were at the forefront of the action, there were those in the background of Roman society who were no less quintessential to the identity of Rome. They could be found in all aspects of Roman life, from the domestic to the agricultural spheres. Paradoxical to their impact on society, but coinciding with their status, they remained largely ignored in ancient literature. These figures were slaves, unpaid for their labour and the property of their owners who could do with them what they wished. This work explores the contribution of slaves to Roman society and the extent to which Rome should be constituted as a ‘slave society’.

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